Author Topic: Teaching KST in dance classes  (Read 61 times)

lightyourworld22

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Teaching KST in dance classes
« on: August 26, 2017, 04:53:44 pm »
So I love this technique and use it myself, but I'm struggling with how to introduce it in my dance classes, especially with younger students and recreational students. I have shorter classes and limited time to spend on stretching so I can't use a 20 minute program every week, especially if I want to take time for students to learn the stretches properly and retain them for work at home. Where do I begin if I can only do a few exercises a week, and gradually build on more? For instance, if we are working on splits, do I just start at the beginning of the program and teach the first few exercises? Do I choose one for each muscle group? What about turnout? Does it matter which exercises we do if we are only doing a few?

Daniel Tkach

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Re: Teaching KST in dance classes
« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2017, 08:04:15 pm »
Hi!
Great questions! I'd like to encourage all the members to provide a reply! Let's make it more interactive. The opinions of all of you here together is better than my own alone.

Hopefully you'll start getting great answers that will help you in your practice. Let's all help lightyourworld22 :)
« Last Edit: September 05, 2017, 12:41:03 pm by Daniel Tkach »
Daniel Tkach
ElasticSteel Team
www.ElasticSteel.net
www.EasyFlexibility.com

lightyourworld22

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Re: Teaching KST in dance classes
« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2017, 10:16:37 pm »
No replies :-\ anyone have some ideas you can share?

Daniel Tkach

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Re: Teaching KST in dance classes
« Reply #3 on: September 05, 2017, 12:57:30 pm »
So I love this technique and use it myself, but I'm struggling with how to introduce it in my dance classes, especially with younger students and recreational students. I have shorter classes and limited time to spend on stretching so I can't use a 20 minute program every week, especially if I want to take time for students to learn the stretches properly and retain them for work at home. Where do I begin if I can only do a few exercises a week, and gradually build on more? For instance, if we are working on splits, do I just start at the beginning of the program and teach the first few exercises? Do I choose one for each muscle group? What about turnout? Does it matter which exercises we do if we are only doing a few?

Ok, let me reply, I still hope someone else participates.

As with anything else, with stretching you get results according to HOW you practice, and HOW MUCH you practice. So 10 minutes every now and then won't give you results. I'd say the minimum to get good results is 30 minutes three times a week, at a medium intensity, this would be the bare minimum.

You should find a way to combine your other exercises with ZST exercises. And as the ebook explains, ZST work better before other exercises and in between, and it's not meant to be used at the end if your goal is flexibility.

If you need 20 minutes to teach just 1 stretch, then you have to do so, and it will be worth it. Then next time you won't have to explain it all over, and you can add a new one every class, which everyone will learn faster.

So you can implement one stretch at a time, and the first time you do so it's a good idea to explain the principles. If the principles of target and leverage are understood, then you just need to show what the leverage and target for a particular exercise are, and combined with a quick demonstration they should pick it up fairly quickly.

Focus on explaining the principles first. Then implement one stretch per class, and have them do it many times in between the other exercises you teach. Introduce a new one when they are all comfortable with this new weird stretch. Name each stretch appropriately, so next time you say "now let's do Integrity" they will all know what you mean.

For splits the routine must be very specific, and ALL muscles should be worked on flexibility AND STRENGTH, plus the strength of the antagonists. This is demonstrated in the new splits programs, and in high detail in the splits seminar. If there's only one muscle that is tight, this one will prevent a full split, so all muscles must be trained. Same thing for the turnout, many muscles rotate in and out. This transfers to any other skill, a developpe, a side kick, a bridge, etc.

There are some explanations about these topics on our blogs, which are over 50, and they are all free!

Let us know what you think about this above.

Thanks.
Daniel Tkach
ElasticSteel Team
www.ElasticSteel.net
www.EasyFlexibility.com