General Category > Kinesiological Stretching Technique Seminar Discussion

Class Sequencing and Structure for INSTRUCTORS

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Rana:
Hello,
I hope this thread will attract some people, especially instructors. I'm a flexibility instructor at a pole and aerial studio, and as much as I need more knowledge and more content for my classes where we go into deep stretches and poses, I have big problem with this program and can't seem to find any information about my topic in question.

I think there should be a section in this course about how to structure a flexibility class and how to include the stretches in your classes. I've tried to add some of these stretches in my classes but I find so many students struggling with the leverage and target technique and most students apply the leverage incorrectly. Moreover, I find it very impractical to use these techniques in a class with 15 students. I find these techniques to be good for private one-on-one instruction and some kind of session where you can take your time but how does it work for bigger classes where no one easily understands the technique. As someone who has studied the technique, I understand it but my students don't.

Don't get me wrong. The knowledge in this certification and techniques in it are really amazing and it has helped me personally to go much deeper into my stretches. I just find it super hard and impractical to use in classes and now that I've taken my certification, I was a bit disappointed because I'm totally lost as to how to use it in classes, and I now find it useless to me. I'm sure there's a way to use it but I just don't know how to

So my question is:
How do I incorporate these stretches and this technique into my classes in a way that is practical and that all students can understand?

If anyone has any experience adding this technique into their classes and has found a practical and useful way to use the easy flexibility program in their classes please help me out.

lilyaloha@gmail.com:
Hi Ranamah,
I hope I'm pronouncing your name correctly.
If you want to teach a class with only KST you can follow the siquence used in the two free DVDs you were given. Which is Warmup/KST/Relaxed Stretches.
If you want to incorporate it into a dance class for example you can add the exisises in the end when the body is already warm and you can still finish with relaxed stretches after KST.
Now on the struggling students, I will use an example. At the moment I'm teaching 12 figure skaters between the age of 8 and 13. Their attention spam is super low and they were also make mistakes and sometimes struggle to understand. So what I do is I demonstrate, then do it with them slowly, wile saying each action. For the second limb of round (if it's back or head) I pick the students that struggle the most to assist and ajust them and everyone else follow that student. By second/third round everyone is doing the exircises. Most important is to patient, this is a new technique and for some people it takes time to process it.
I hope the information I gave you was helpful.
Lily

Daniel Tkach:
Hello Ranamahmoud.9011! Great question that you are posting. Fortunately this forum is meant to provide for that. Whatever you find difficult, take it as a challenge, and post it here.

As with everything, teaching something new requires practice, and most of all total grasp from your part. Last classes I taught, there were over 100 students (I attached some pictures), I couldn't have done it at the beginning, it was even hard to explain an exercise to one person. As you practice the exercises more and make the technique yours, it becomes easier. You have to find how to explain them in your own words.

Let's do this. Record a video of yourself explaining a KST, and I'll provide my feedback.

Paul says beginner KS classes are longer because we have to take time explaining the exercises. If an exercise takes you 20 minutes to explain, you do have to take your time to explain it. The second or third exercise you explain won't take that much, and after a student came for a third or fourth class you won't have to explain so much to that person anymore, only adjust details such as "do it quicker", "don't come up on this move", "move more to the left on this one" etc.

Taking your time to explain an exercise so that everyone does it the best they can will in the end SAVE them time since they'll achieve their goals faster. In Chinese philosophy they call this awkwardly translated "invest in loss". One is seemingly wasting a lot of time on something, which ultimately will make you save time.

Moving on to the question of structure. The KS techniques are meant to be used in between everything else. This is not "stretching that is done at the end", the goal of KST is not that, it is not cooling down (though you can use it in a passive static modality) but it's not the primary goal. The goal of KSTs is increasing range of motion, so the best thing is to do them after a warm up, then followed by ELC exercises, or sport specific techniques, which will then produce the effect of "fixing" the new ranges.

1# Joints and mobility warm up, with optional cardiovascular warmup.
2# Activity specific warm up, exercises that resemble the techniques you are going to practice in that session.
3# KST, the ones that will help you get deeper ranges and make those techniques you are going to practice easier.
4# The activity specific techniques you've been preparing for with #2 and #3.
5# You can repeat, and actually you should, 3 and 4, for at least 2 rounds. It's most effective to do 5 to 6.
6# Additional more demanding sport specific techniques, involving primarily reciprocal inhibition exercises, antagonists short range training, that is, active flexibility exercises.
7# Cool down.

I'll stop there and wait for your questions, lot of information on this message already  8)






Rana:
Hi Lily :)
Don't worry about it it's just Rana  :D
Thank you very much for your reply. It was very helpful indeed. I think I'll just have to buy more of the DVDs to have more structured classes and to know which stretches are ok to teach with others, not that it isn't clear in the certification but I find the DVDs to be more structured to a certain focused class.
But thank you so much Lily for your help! Much appreciated  :)

Rana:

--- Quote from: Daniel Tkach on June 20, 2017, 09:32:37 am ---Hello Ranamahmoud.9011! Great question that you are posting. Fortunately this forum is meant to provide for that. Whatever you find difficult, take it as a challenge, and post it here.

As with everything, teaching something new requires practice, and most of all total grasp from your part. Last classes I taught, there were over 100 students (I attached some pictures), I couldn't have done it at the beginning, it was even hard to explain an exercise to one person. As you practice the exercises more and make the technique yours, it becomes easier. You have to find how to explain them in your own words.

Let's do this. Record a video of yourself explaining a KST, and I'll provide my feedback.

Paul says beginner KS classes are longer because we have to take time explaining the exercises. If an exercise takes you 20 minutes to explain, you do have to take your time to explain it. The second or third exercise you explain won't take that much, and after a student came for a third or fourth class you won't have to explain so much to that person anymore, only adjust details such as "do it quicker", "don't come up on this move", "move more to the left on this one" etc.

Taking your time to explain an exercise so that everyone does it the best they can will in the end SAVE them time since they'll achieve their goals faster. In Chinese philosophy they call this awkwardly translated "invest in loss". One is seemingly wasting a lot of time on something, which ultimately will make you save time.

Moving on to the question of structure. The KS techniques are meant to be used in between everything else. This is not "stretching that is done at the end", the goal of KST is not that, it is not cooling down (though you can use it in a passive static modality) but it's not the primary goal. The goal of KSTs is increasing range of motion, so the best thing is to do them after a warm up, then followed by ELC exercises, or sport specific techniques, which will then produce the effect of "fixing" the new ranges.

1# Joints and mobility warm up, with optional cardiovascular warmup.
2# Activity specific warm up, exercises that resemble the techniques you are going to practice in that session.
3# KST, the ones that will help you get deeper ranges and make those techniques you are going to practice easier.
4# The activity specific techniques you've been preparing for with #2 and #3.
5# You can repeat, and actually you should, 3 and 4, for at least 2 rounds. It's most effective to do 5 to 6.
6# Additional more demanding sport specific techniques, involving primarily reciprocal inhibition exercises, antagonists short range training, that is, active flexibility exercises.
7# Cool down.

I'll stop there and wait for your questions, lot of information on this message already  8)








--- End quote ---


Hello Daniel, I'm Rana  :)

Wow wow wow that is indeed a lot of information but it is perfectly suited to my question! Just what i needed.
So yes then I was right to think the KST class has to be longer because the posture and leverage and target and all movement in between has to be correct. I agree that the more you practice a technique the better you get at understanding and explaining it. I will try with the video and will attach it here in the coming days and you can tell me what you think.

Since I teach flexibility classes as well as the dance ones, my classes are purely flexibility and stretching focused, I don't intend to do the exercises as a way to cool down or as stretches at the end of a dance class. Moreover, they would take up a lot of time to just finish of a class with and I don't see how they would be beneficial as much as they were intended to be.

So correct me if I'm wrong, the KST stretches are intended to increase range of motion to achieve a certain deep or intense pose. It's like the pieces of a puzzle that you have to put together to create your own session and you get to pick what this session focuses on. So basically the KST stretches are like the means to an end, and the conclusion is that you will improve in a certain pose like a forward bend, or front splits, or a bridge pose.

So what I'd have to do would be to separate the KST classes from the normal flexibility classes, or I'd have to give my classes a kind of a make over and increase the length of the classes. My other option would be to give workshops for those interested to go over some KST stretches and have them understand better the technique and then carry out normal classes.

As for the structure of the class, let's see if I got what you explained.
-For steps 3 and 4, if I apply this to forward bending, I'd be doing in step 3 the KSTs that isolate the muscles that we use for forward bending (ex. glutes, hamstrings...).
-Then in step 4, I'd go ahead and have them do a seated forward bend.
-Then according to what you say, I should repeat this pattern for forward bends 3 times (as an example but I know you said 5 to 6 times).
-Now for step 6, I don't think I understand what you mean. But you mention active flexibility so by that I'm guessing you mean the more intense exercises like a lying down PNF hamstring stretch, where the students have to use the antagonist muscles to push their leg away from their body, then release and pull their legs in closer.

-So if I'm getting this right, this means that the KST stretches, are not meant to be used on their own, so they come after a warm-up of course and they're like a section of the session followed by deeper more intense stretches (active flexibility), followed by the target poses to be achieved at the end of the session.

I have another question as well. How do I plan out what classes to have? I get very confused on how many classes to carry out, if I should have for example a backbending class and a splits class. Or should I have a hip opening class, a leg stretches class, a back and shoulder class. I've always been so lost on how to create the perfect structure and I've seen a variety of studios and each studio has something different. Hope I'm clear on this question.

This was so much information to process already! I hope I got most of what you meant and am not confusing things.

Thank you so so much for your reply Daniel!  :) :)

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