Author Topic: Class Sequencing and Structure for INSTRUCTORS  (Read 437 times)

Rana

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Class Sequencing and Structure for INSTRUCTORS
« on: June 20, 2017, 06:31:13 am »
Hello,
I hope this thread will attract some people, especially instructors. I'm a flexibility instructor at a pole and aerial studio, and as much as I need more knowledge and more content for my classes where we go into deep stretches and poses, I have big problem with this program and can't seem to find any information about my topic in question.

I think there should be a section in this course about how to structure a flexibility class and how to include the stretches in your classes. I've tried to add some of these stretches in my classes but I find so many students struggling with the leverage and target technique and most students apply the leverage incorrectly. Moreover, I find it very impractical to use these techniques in a class with 15 students. I find these techniques to be good for private one-on-one instruction and some kind of session where you can take your time but how does it work for bigger classes where no one easily understands the technique. As someone who has studied the technique, I understand it but my students don't.

Don't get me wrong. The knowledge in this certification and techniques in it are really amazing and it has helped me personally to go much deeper into my stretches. I just find it super hard and impractical to use in classes and now that I've taken my certification, I was a bit disappointed because I'm totally lost as to how to use it in classes, and I now find it useless to me. I'm sure there's a way to use it but I just don't know how to

So my question is:
How do I incorporate these stretches and this technique into my classes in a way that is practical and that all students can understand?

If anyone has any experience adding this technique into their classes and has found a practical and useful way to use the easy flexibility program in their classes please help me out.

lilyaloha@gmail.com

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Re: Class Sequencing and Structure for INSTRUCTORS
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2017, 08:41:21 am »
Hi Ranamah,
I hope I'm pronouncing your name correctly.
If you want to teach a class with only KST you can follow the siquence used in the two free DVDs you were given. Which is Warmup/KST/Relaxed Stretches.
If you want to incorporate it into a dance class for example you can add the exisises in the end when the body is already warm and you can still finish with relaxed stretches after KST.
Now on the struggling students, I will use an example. At the moment I'm teaching 12 figure skaters between the age of 8 and 13. Their attention spam is super low and they were also make mistakes and sometimes struggle to understand. So what I do is I demonstrate, then do it with them slowly, wile saying each action. For the second limb of round (if it's back or head) I pick the students that struggle the most to assist and ajust them and everyone else follow that student. By second/third round everyone is doing the exircises. Most important is to patient, this is a new technique and for some people it takes time to process it.
I hope the information I gave you was helpful.
Lily

Daniel Tkach

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Re: Class Sequencing and Structure for INSTRUCTORS
« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2017, 09:32:37 am »
Hello Ranamahmoud.9011! Great question that you are posting. Fortunately this forum is meant to provide for that. Whatever you find difficult, take it as a challenge, and post it here.

As with everything, teaching something new requires practice, and most of all total grasp from your part. Last classes I taught, there were over 100 students (I attached some pictures), I couldn't have done it at the beginning, it was even hard to explain an exercise to one person. As you practice the exercises more and make the technique yours, it becomes easier. You have to find how to explain them in your own words.

Let's do this. Record a video of yourself explaining a KST, and I'll provide my feedback.

Paul says beginner KS classes are longer because we have to take time explaining the exercises. If an exercise takes you 20 minutes to explain, you do have to take your time to explain it. The second or third exercise you explain won't take that much, and after a student came for a third or fourth class you won't have to explain so much to that person anymore, only adjust details such as "do it quicker", "don't come up on this move", "move more to the left on this one" etc.

Taking your time to explain an exercise so that everyone does it the best they can will in the end SAVE them time since they'll achieve their goals faster. In Chinese philosophy they call this awkwardly translated "invest in loss". One is seemingly wasting a lot of time on something, which ultimately will make you save time.

Moving on to the question of structure. The KS techniques are meant to be used in between everything else. This is not "stretching that is done at the end", the goal of KST is not that, it is not cooling down (though you can use it in a passive static modality) but it's not the primary goal. The goal of KSTs is increasing range of motion, so the best thing is to do them after a warm up, then followed by ELC exercises, or sport specific techniques, which will then produce the effect of "fixing" the new ranges.

1# Joints and mobility warm up, with optional cardiovascular warmup.
2# Activity specific warm up, exercises that resemble the techniques you are going to practice in that session.
3# KST, the ones that will help you get deeper ranges and make those techniques you are going to practice easier.
4# The activity specific techniques you've been preparing for with #2 and #3.
5# You can repeat, and actually you should, 3 and 4, for at least 2 rounds. It's most effective to do 5 to 6.
6# Additional more demanding sport specific techniques, involving primarily reciprocal inhibition exercises, antagonists short range training, that is, active flexibility exercises.
7# Cool down.

I'll stop there and wait for your questions, lot of information on this message already  8)






Daniel Tkach
ElasticSteel Team
www.ElasticSteel.net
www.EasyFlexibility.com

Rana

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Re: Class Sequencing and Structure for INSTRUCTORS
« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2017, 09:35:35 am »
Hi Lily :)
Don't worry about it it's just Rana  :D
Thank you very much for your reply. It was very helpful indeed. I think I'll just have to buy more of the DVDs to have more structured classes and to know which stretches are ok to teach with others, not that it isn't clear in the certification but I find the DVDs to be more structured to a certain focused class.
But thank you so much Lily for your help! Much appreciated  :)

Rana

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Re: Class Sequencing and Structure for INSTRUCTORS
« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2017, 10:19:13 am »
Hello Ranamahmoud.9011! Great question that you are posting. Fortunately this forum is meant to provide for that. Whatever you find difficult, take it as a challenge, and post it here.

As with everything, teaching something new requires practice, and most of all total grasp from your part. Last classes I taught, there were over 100 students (I attached some pictures), I couldn't have done it at the beginning, it was even hard to explain an exercise to one person. As you practice the exercises more and make the technique yours, it becomes easier. You have to find how to explain them in your own words.

Let's do this. Record a video of yourself explaining a KST, and I'll provide my feedback.

Paul says beginner KS classes are longer because we have to take time explaining the exercises. If an exercise takes you 20 minutes to explain, you do have to take your time to explain it. The second or third exercise you explain won't take that much, and after a student came for a third or fourth class you won't have to explain so much to that person anymore, only adjust details such as "do it quicker", "don't come up on this move", "move more to the left on this one" etc.

Taking your time to explain an exercise so that everyone does it the best they can will in the end SAVE them time since they'll achieve their goals faster. In Chinese philosophy they call this awkwardly translated "invest in loss". One is seemingly wasting a lot of time on something, which ultimately will make you save time.

Moving on to the question of structure. The KS techniques are meant to be used in between everything else. This is not "stretching that is done at the end", the goal of KST is not that, it is not cooling down (though you can use it in a passive static modality) but it's not the primary goal. The goal of KSTs is increasing range of motion, so the best thing is to do them after a warm up, then followed by ELC exercises, or sport specific techniques, which will then produce the effect of "fixing" the new ranges.

1# Joints and mobility warm up, with optional cardiovascular warmup.
2# Activity specific warm up, exercises that resemble the techniques you are going to practice in that session.
3# KST, the ones that will help you get deeper ranges and make those techniques you are going to practice easier.
4# The activity specific techniques you've been preparing for with #2 and #3.
5# You can repeat, and actually you should, 3 and 4, for at least 2 rounds. It's most effective to do 5 to 6.
6# Additional more demanding sport specific techniques, involving primarily reciprocal inhibition exercises, antagonists short range training, that is, active flexibility exercises.
7# Cool down.

I'll stop there and wait for your questions, lot of information on this message already  8)









Hello Daniel, I'm Rana  :)

Wow wow wow that is indeed a lot of information but it is perfectly suited to my question! Just what i needed.
So yes then I was right to think the KST class has to be longer because the posture and leverage and target and all movement in between has to be correct. I agree that the more you practice a technique the better you get at understanding and explaining it. I will try with the video and will attach it here in the coming days and you can tell me what you think.

Since I teach flexibility classes as well as the dance ones, my classes are purely flexibility and stretching focused, I don't intend to do the exercises as a way to cool down or as stretches at the end of a dance class. Moreover, they would take up a lot of time to just finish of a class with and I don't see how they would be beneficial as much as they were intended to be.

So correct me if I'm wrong, the KST stretches are intended to increase range of motion to achieve a certain deep or intense pose. It's like the pieces of a puzzle that you have to put together to create your own session and you get to pick what this session focuses on. So basically the KST stretches are like the means to an end, and the conclusion is that you will improve in a certain pose like a forward bend, or front splits, or a bridge pose.

So what I'd have to do would be to separate the KST classes from the normal flexibility classes, or I'd have to give my classes a kind of a make over and increase the length of the classes. My other option would be to give workshops for those interested to go over some KST stretches and have them understand better the technique and then carry out normal classes.

As for the structure of the class, let's see if I got what you explained.
-For steps 3 and 4, if I apply this to forward bending, I'd be doing in step 3 the KSTs that isolate the muscles that we use for forward bending (ex. glutes, hamstrings...).
-Then in step 4, I'd go ahead and have them do a seated forward bend.
-Then according to what you say, I should repeat this pattern for forward bends 3 times (as an example but I know you said 5 to 6 times).
-Now for step 6, I don't think I understand what you mean. But you mention active flexibility so by that I'm guessing you mean the more intense exercises like a lying down PNF hamstring stretch, where the students have to use the antagonist muscles to push their leg away from their body, then release and pull their legs in closer.

-So if I'm getting this right, this means that the KST stretches, are not meant to be used on their own, so they come after a warm-up of course and they're like a section of the session followed by deeper more intense stretches (active flexibility), followed by the target poses to be achieved at the end of the session.

I have another question as well. How do I plan out what classes to have? I get very confused on how many classes to carry out, if I should have for example a backbending class and a splits class. Or should I have a hip opening class, a leg stretches class, a back and shoulder class. I've always been so lost on how to create the perfect structure and I've seen a variety of studios and each studio has something different. Hope I'm clear on this question.

This was so much information to process already! I hope I got most of what you meant and am not confusing things.

Thank you so so much for your reply Daniel!  :) :)

Daniel Tkach

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Re: Class Sequencing and Structure for INSTRUCTORS
« Reply #5 on: June 20, 2017, 01:50:27 pm »

Hello Daniel, I'm Rana  :)
Hello Rana, nice to meet you :)

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Wow wow wow that is indeed a lot of information but it is perfectly suited to my question! Just what i needed.
So yes then I was right to think the KST class has to be longer because the posture and leverage and target and all movement in between has to be correct. I agree that the more you practice a technique the better you get at understanding and explaining it. I will try with the video and will attach it here in the coming days and you can tell me what you think.
Yes, you were right, you realized it takes time and it's a lot of work, and indeed it is.

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Since I teach flexibility classes as well as the dance ones, my classes are purely flexibility and stretching focused, I don't intend to do the exercises as a way to cool down or as stretches at the end of a dance class. Moreover, they would take up a lot of time to just finish of a class with and I don't see how they would be beneficial as much as they were intended to be.
You can easily incorporate a few KST in between the rest of the work you do in class. You could do one per class? You can also teach the name, so after a couple of classes doing "~Integrity~" they will all know it's that weird exercise ;)


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So correct me if I'm wrong, the KST stretches are intended to increase range of motion to achieve a certain deep or intense pose. It's like the pieces of a puzzle that you have to put together to create your own session and you get to pick what this session focuses on. So basically the KST stretches are like the means to an end, and the conclusion is that you will improve in a certain pose like a forward bend, or front splits, or a bridge pose.
Exactly. If the goal is side splits then a certain group of KST help, if it's front splits then a different one, if it's bridges or high kicks it's different etc. You might as well do a general "upper body" class, or "lower body", or just general, where you pick 4 or 5 KST, along with other exercises for support and as you guessed right, KST are not enough. On a workout we need:
- KST
- ELC
- MHT
- PC
- RI

+ ELC I guess you know it? We have a video on lower body ELC, and I'm sure I posted here some and we also have the blogs, over 20 blogs + about the method in general. ELC focuses on the muscles that got stretched.

+ MHT, movement and habituation techniques. Moving on a stretched position.

+ PC, peripheral conditioning, conditioning of muscles that are neither the contracting ones (ELC) nor the antagonists (RI).

+ RI, reciprocal inhibition techniques, contacting hip flexors to release hip extensors for example. Needed to keep flexibility gains. And yes, most of this is not in the seminar and I agree with you in that the seminar is not fully complete. We compensate this with the blogs, and well, the programs you can pick for free or purchase on the store.

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So what I'd have to do would be to separate the KST classes from the normal flexibility classes, or I'd have to give my classes a kind of a make over and increase the length of the classes. My other option would be to give workshops for those interested to go over some KST stretches and have them understand better the technique and then carry out normal classes.
Here you have some great ideas! One thing, "normal flexibility classes", not using KS? Whatever you do in those classes won't be as effective as a KST based class if it's for flexibility. A flexibility class should contain KST + ELC + MHT + RI, otherwise the work is not as effective as it could be. If the class is good as a class itself, people like them and so on, then great, but if the goal of the class is flexibility then again: KST+ELC+MHT+RI.

I know it's hard to make the change, and accept that holding a stretch won't produce permanent flexibility gains. It took me a couple of years to completely get used to the KS idea. I just had to experiment it to realize that holding a stretch in the traditional sense and not working on MHT and RI etc. won't give me actual flexibility. 10+ years of static stretching aren't easy to forget...

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As for the structure of the class, let's see if I got what you explained.
-For steps 3 and 4, if I apply this to forward bending, I'd be doing in step 3 the KSTs that isolate the muscles that we use for forward bending (ex. glutes, hamstrings...).
-Then in step 4, I'd go ahead and have them do a seated forward bend.
Exactly. Remember to include ELC, MHT, and RI. So, what's missing here for real effectiveness is: tensing hamstrings and glutes, doing stiff dead lifts for example; moving while on a seated bend (coming in and out, moving sideways etc be creative); and for RI, holding legs up, then forward bend, repeat a few times.

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-Then according to what you say, I should repeat this pattern for forward bends 3 times (as an example but I know you said 5 to 6 times).
2 to 3 times sounds good for a regular class. If it's for you, or advice for students training at home, 6 for maximum effectiveness and rapid gains.

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-Now for step 6, I don't think I understand what you mean. But you mention active flexibility so by that I'm guessing you mean the more intense exercises like a lying down PNF hamstring stretch, where the students have to use the antagonist muscles to push their leg away from their body, then release and pull their legs in closer.
Active flexibility is working on antagonists in short range. In the case of a seated forward bend, let's see, sitting back straight, legs as straight as possible, and from there without moving your spine lift one leg, hold for 3 to 15 seconds. There's not much on this out there. We teach it on some specialized programs, like the ballet ones and the elasticsteel kick mastery system and quite extensively on the splits seminar.

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-So if I'm getting this right, this means that the KST stretches, are not meant to be used on their own, so they come after a warm-up of course and they're like a section of the session followed by deeper more intense stretches (active flexibility), followed by the target poses to be achieved at the end of the session.
Exactly. KST should always go together with ELC + MHT + RI.
Active flexibility is not really "more intense stretches", it's the training that will give you functional flexibility, so we must work on antagonists to those muscles stretched, we must work on the muscles that actually produce the movement or posture you are aiming towards. If it's a developpe, then hip flexors work, if it's a front attitude then external rotators and adductors, if it's a side kick then gluteus minimus and medius in short range, etc.

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I have another question as well. How do I plan out what classes to have? I get very confused on how many classes to carry out, if I should have for example a backbending class and a splits class. Or should I have a hip opening class, a leg stretches class, a back and shoulder class. I've always been so lost on how to create the perfect structure and I've seen a variety of studios and each studio has something different. Hope I'm clear on this question.
The options you mention for a class sound perfect. You can have classes focused on certain postures which could be yoga, dance or martial arts postures, you can have other classes muscle specific, so a hamstrings class, and adductors class, then you can have a class by how we organize the course "side bending class" "back bending" "shoulder flexion", then another for "conditions" such as "neck pain", "TFL pain" "piriformis syndrome" etc.

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This was so much information to process already! I hope I got most of what you meant and am not confusing things.
Very good questions. You'll learn by doing and teaching over the years, don't freak out haha

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Thank you so so much for your reply Daniel!  :) :)
My pleasure to help and share.
Daniel Tkach
ElasticSteel Team
www.ElasticSteel.net
www.EasyFlexibility.com

Rana

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Re: Class Sequencing and Structure for INSTRUCTORS
« Reply #6 on: June 24, 2017, 07:13:09 am »
Hello again Daniel,

I just read your reply. Thank you so much for all the great information. I think I have to research all of this, I'm not familiar with everything and I have to understand.  I think I really like the structure you've mentioned but i need to understand each section of the flexibility class meaning the ELC, MHT, PC, and RI techniques. I got a general idea of what ech means but I'm not really sure.
I need to research and see videos so I'll go ahead and do this and process all this info and get back to you again  with what I understand.

Thanks so much  :)

Rana

Daniel Tkach

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Re: Class Sequencing and Structure for INSTRUCTORS
« Reply #7 on: June 24, 2017, 10:43:30 am »
Hello again Daniel,

I just read your reply. Thank you so much for all the great information. I think I have to research all of this, I'm not familiar with everything and I have to understand.  I think I really like the structure you've mentioned but i need to understand each section of the flexibility class meaning the ELC, MHT, PC, and RI techniques. I got a general idea of what ech means but I'm not really sure.
I need to research and see videos so I'll go ahead and do this and process all this info and get back to you again  with what I understand.

Thanks so much  :)

Rana

Hello Rana, yes, it will take time for you to digest all this.
We teach the techniques here and there, on some of the videos, and many on the splits course:
https://www.easyflexibility.com/collections/online-certification-seminar/products/easysplits-certification-course-24-30-lessons-2

There's not a lot more to it than what I explained above. Now the question for you is to find creative ways to put it into practice, design exercises for each category, or get a few other videos that show some exercises until you got a natural grasp of the idea for each.

ELC: contract the muscles that are stretching, this is usually concentric work.
MHT: get into your maximum stretched position, and move your whole body in creative ways.
RI: contract antagonists, then go deeper into the stretch and repeat. The contractions for this technique are usually 3 seconds, no more.
PC: contract the rest of the muscles, muscle groups which are not antagonists or agonists. Here the technique works best with 30 seconds contractions at least, to really condition your muscles. It also works if you do repetitions while maintaining the stretched position. An example, let's say you did a few rounds of the stretches and now you are deeper into your straddle, while on a straddle the stretched muscles are adductors, the antagonists are glutes, so the rest would be hamstrings and hip flexors, those are the ones to work with on this technique. To work on hamstrings sink your legs to the floor, to work on hip flexors hold your legs up.  ;D Is this clearer?

And that's about it. Experiment and share what you are able to find.
Take care.
Daniel Tkach
ElasticSteel Team
www.ElasticSteel.net
www.EasyFlexibility.com

Rana

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Re: Class Sequencing and Structure for INSTRUCTORS
« Reply #8 on: July 31, 2017, 08:32:13 am »
Hello Daniel  :)
Sorry I've been very busy and also trying to digest all this info we talked about. I have a few questions for you as I've tried researching a lot of what you said but can't find much on the internet. I will try to color code each section I discuss for the sake of organizing my thoughts

1. About ELC, I've tried researching it but I can't find much on it so I will try to purchase the video pretty soon so I can best understand what you're talking about.


2. MHT: if I were to perform this on front splits, then I'd get into my split and try to move my hips side to side for example, rocking side ways? Does this work on any kind of stretch? If I'm getting it wrong please elaborate.

3. RI: if I'm not mistaken, I think this is PNF stretching right? If not please explain further. On the Hamstrings Advanced DVD, there's this exercise lying on the back stretching the hamstrings where you engage the quads to pull your leg away from you, then release and pull the leg closer to the chest. Does this fall into RI technique?

4. PC technique is clear according to what you explained.

I'm guessing that I have to do a lot of brainstorming for every technique to see how to add these techniques into my classes which is something I get very lazy doing  ;D :D If there are ready made stretches or videos for each technique please refer to them because they'd probably be more correct than what I would try to invent for my students.

I would like you, if it's not too much to ask, to give me an example for each of these techniques, for example if I'm working on front splits, or any specific goal so I can better understand these techniques.
Another request, if you have certain articles I can read about each technique or something to explain more? I really couldn't find much and when I found something I wasn't sure if it was the technique you were talking about.

Thanks so much for your help again  :)

Daniel Tkach

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Re: Class Sequencing and Structure for INSTRUCTORS
« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2017, 10:10:54 am »
Hello Daniel  :)
Sorry I've been very busy and also trying to digest all this info we talked about. I have a few questions for you as I've tried researching a lot of what you said but can't find much on the internet. I will try to color code each section I discuss for the sake of organizing my thoughts
Hi Rana! Nice to hear that you are studying hard.
If you google the information I gave you you'll get two options:
1- you'll find nothing
2- you'll find us
Ha! Let me be clear. No one else teaches this. I know some schools who know a bit of this, but keep it secret, these are mostly schools that train high level athletes. As mysterious this sounds, think about it, the school that possess information like what we teach will be the one winning tournaments, the olympics, getting more prestige, more students, more money...


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1. About ELC, I've tried researching it but I can't find much on it so I will try to purchase the video pretty soon so I can best understand what you're talking about.

The ELC video is gold. You'll find ELC techniques aimed at splits in the EasySplits course and on the new Master Splits Combo.

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2. MHT: if I were to perform this on front splits, then I'd get into my split and try to move my hips side to side for example, rocking side ways? Does this work on any kind of stretch? If I'm getting it wrong please elaborate.
Yes, that's ok. Another one is, open and close the split, alternating sides, you can do it sideways, or while on a shoulderstand. The technique of moving while stretching works with any kind of stretch or joint yet.

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3. RI: if I'm not mistaken, I think this is PNF stretching right? If not please explain further. On the Hamstrings Advanced DVD, there's this exercise lying on the back stretching the hamstrings where you engage the quads to pull your leg away from you, then release and pull the leg closer to the chest. Does this fall into RI technique?
No it is not. The contracted muscle on PNF is the one being stretched, the contracted one on RI is the antagonist of the one being stretched, and the contraction is held no more than 3 seconds to be effective.
Pushing the leg contracting quads and hip flexors is a RI technique for stretching hamstrings, yes.

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4. PC technique is clear according to what you explained.
Great! Now use your creativity to come up with a lot of different exercises and share them with us!

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I'm guessing that I have to do a lot of brainstorming for every technique to see how to add these techniques into my classes which is something I get very lazy doing  ;D :D If there are ready made stretches or videos for each technique please refer to them because they'd probably be more correct than what I would try to invent for my students.
Yes, the EasySplits course, there are over 100 exercises in there.

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I would like you, if it's not too much to ask, to give me an example for each of these techniques, for example if I'm working on front splits, or any specific goal so I can better understand these techniques.
One MHT, RI and ELC for front splits? Sure.
MHT: on your side, spread your legs as much as you can in a front split position, hold for half a second, alternate sides. Do 10 to 20 reps.
RI: place two chairs, one to your right another to your left, do a front split in between, use your hands to elevate your body for 3 seconds while holding the split in the air, drop deeper into a split. Repeat 3 to 5 times.
ELC: on a slippery floor, open and close your split using the strength of the stretched muscles.

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Another request, if you have certain articles I can read about each technique or something to explain more? I really couldn't find much and when I found something I wasn't sure if it was the technique you were talking about.
Yes, we have over 50 blogs. In our two websites (EasyFlexibility.com and ElasticSteel.com) you'll find them on the menu at the top of any page. Read them all!

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Thanks so much for your help again  :)
A pleasure to help! Keep up the good work ok?
You forum guys can get EasySplits at 35% off. Send me an email to get the discount code. dtkach@elasticsteel.com

Cheers.
Daniel Tkach
ElasticSteel Team
www.ElasticSteel.net
www.EasyFlexibility.com

lijue@berkeley.edu

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Re: Class Sequencing and Structure for INSTRUCTORS
« Reply #10 on: August 02, 2017, 09:25:45 pm »
Wow. This was an interesting (and long) discussion on class sequencing! I got a lot out of it.
I am planning right now to formulate a class for end of August, incorporating KST into what I call "Strength and Flexibility Workshop" for college students. In this course I have the time to work slowly over a semester (15 weeks) to try and balance gaining flexibility with general strength. I have the ELC video and having recently (today) passed the certification exam, I plan to study that video as well.
I have questions that I came across while studying and trying the exercises, and I know you have answers!! Here goes:

--Having trouble with Confidence (lol): I have tibial tortion which allows my lower legs to move a LOT while my feet and upper legs are stationary. I don't feel anything with this exercise and wonder if this is the issue or if the exercise is just a gentle one anyway. And--is the chest-to-floor just that in terms of target? Can you also tip the hips forward?

--In Courage and Certainty, what if you have tight quads and/or just cannot grab your foot? Strap? I have been bringing my back knee in more, shortening the gap between the legs so I can grab. (upshot is that after doing Clarity and others, it is easier to grab!)

--For Esteem: similar question as above. If person cannot sit on their heel? I had someone sit on the ball of their foot but it was still a bit awkward..

--this may be just an error in the video: It lists Latissimus Dorsi when arms are overhead. Obviously this line is not supposed to be there...Please correct.

Reverence: what if the person cannot reach floor? Yoga blocks? Any other modification?

Kindness: Why is the strap used for this when it is not used for Peace? Just wondering what the logic was on that. I can hold my leg no prob. I gues someone very tight would need strap in Ease, Peace, Kindness..., right?

Why does Harmony not mention any actual muscles such as achilles, gastrox, soleus as target muscles? "all the tissues of the back of leg" seems so vague for Paul who is so very detailed everywhere else. wondering....

Sorry for a MILLION questions. No rush at all. These are my musings as I was watching and studying:)
thanks so much!
Sue

lijue@berkeley.edu

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Re: Class Sequencing and Structure for INSTRUCTORS
« Reply #11 on: August 11, 2017, 04:03:51 pm »
Daniel:
Could you reply on at least some of these questions? I would love to know more!
tx

Daniel Tkach

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Re: Class Sequencing and Structure for INSTRUCTORS
« Reply #12 on: August 11, 2017, 04:52:24 pm »
--Having trouble with Confidence (lol): I have tibial tortion which allows my lower legs to move a LOT while my feet and upper legs are stationary. I don't feel anything with this exercise and wonder if this is the issue or if the exercise is just a gentle one anyway. And--is the chest-to-floor just that in terms of target? Can you also tip the hips forward?
Hi Sue, I had not seen your post, I apologize.
You may skip this exercise, it's really for very tight muscles, extremely tight. You can adjust the position of the hips, flexing more or less, but really you should skip it and only use it on extremely tight muscles. There's a more powerful substitute, the position is different, I'm attaching a picture, let me know if you get it.
The leverage is, pushing a little on your knee to create adduction + internal rotation, and the target is walking your foot out a little each time. You must have good knees to do this, and this is used in cases were the person worked extremelly on the turnout, and there's a big imbalance, the stretch is felt deeply in cases like this (great ballet dancers hehe).

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--In Courage and Certainty, what if you have tight quads and/or just cannot grab your foot? Strap? I have been bringing my back knee in more, shortening the gap between the legs so I can grab. (upshot is that after doing Clarity and others, it is easier to grab!)
Exactly, if you can't grab your foot, then you are not there yet to do the exercise, and you should better do other adductor stretches, or work on a few sets of Clarity as preparation.
Not all stretches must be done by everyone, and it's perfect to use an assisted modality, someone else moving the persons' limbs, preferably using a contract relax approach, tensing 12 seconds on the leverage, and then a slow, controlled and small target.

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--For Esteem: similar question as above. If person cannot sit on their heel? I had someone sit on the ball of their foot but it was still a bit awkward..
They may do it standing, one leg straight on top of something at hip level. And quoting Paul when I asked a similar question, "you can do it on a headstand if you want". So the position can be changed, as long as it targets the same muscle and you use the same actions, the exercise is practically the same regardless of the position.

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--this may be just an error in the video: It lists Latissimus Dorsi when arms are overhead. Obviously this line is not supposed to be there...Please correct.
The latissimus dorsi is an extensor of the shoulder, so it is definitely stretched in flexion, no error here.

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Reverence: what if the person cannot reach floor? Yoga blocks? Any other modification?
Blocks should do it! Or New York Times Bestsellers. (I read so many of those!)

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Kindness: Why is the strap used for this when it is not used for Peace? Just wondering what the logic was on that. I can hold my leg no prob. I gues someone very tight would need strap in Ease, Peace, Kindness..., right?
Exactly. We are showing different variations, with strap, without strap, nothing special.

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Why does Harmony not mention any actual muscles such as achilles, gastrox, soleus as target muscles? "all the tissues of the back of leg" seems so vague for Paul who is so very detailed everywhere else. wondering....
Who knows what he was thinking when he wrote that... I guess he thought to specify as much is enough, since he says ALL tissues.

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Sorry for a MILLION questions. No rush at all. These are my musings as I was watching and studying:)
thanks so much!
Sue

You are welcome Sue! If you'd like to do something back, share some pictures and videos of your class!
Daniel Tkach
ElasticSteel Team
www.ElasticSteel.net
www.EasyFlexibility.com

lijue@berkeley.edu

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Re: Class Sequencing and Structure for INSTRUCTORS
« Reply #13 on: August 15, 2017, 08:03:30 pm »
Wow. Thank you Daniel. I love your replies! Yes, I got the pic you posted of Vitality. thanks. It is good to know that not every stretch NEEDS to be done by everyone, and to use good judgement when working with individuals that need modification. I am getting nice results from the few people I have worked with (er, practiced on...). They have been great in letting me wade through some exercises, knowing that they are helping me learn while they get the benefit! Win-win!
I will keep you posted on my class. I am anxious to start and see what the response is....
thanks again!

Daniel Tkach

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Re: Class Sequencing and Structure for INSTRUCTORS
« Reply #14 on: August 17, 2017, 01:26:49 pm »
lol, our first students will suff.. errrrmr ENJOY it more  8)

Let us know how it goes. You won't need luck, you have your knowledge + The method = best results ever.
Daniel Tkach
ElasticSteel Team
www.ElasticSteel.net
www.EasyFlexibility.com